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To Cover Scents, or Not To Cover Scents

Appealing to the senses

To Cover Scents, or Not To Cover Scents

Postby Big_Willy » Mon Feb 23, 2009 1:34 pm

To Cover Scents, or Not To Cover Scents



Many people swear by cover scents and others wear motor oil soaked bib overalls that they wore at work for a week, O.K. maybe not that farfetched, but you all know the guy I’m referring to. At times in the past it was me wearing those work duds out on a hunting trip, I just had nothing else warm and didn’t think twice about the diesel fuel and tractor grease odors that were being lofted downwind from me at all times. In the more recent years the availability of cheap odor absorbing cover scents led me to purchase some for a test. I bought a so called bargain pack which contained scent absorbing spray, body soap (do not use in hair, trust me!), odorless laundry detergent, a large zip-lock style bag for your washed clothes and some fresh earth scent dryer sheets. It’s amazing how they capture the essence of dirt in a fragrance; I personally would prefer pine scent or something other than what I smell all day at work when excavating …LOL...
After I bought my first kit and some other spray brands, I followed the directions on the products to the key and went hunting, but I realized I have a major conundrum on my hands now. How was I to prove these products work without some sort of scientific equipment measuring the human scent particles (or what have you) filling the air around me. I can say “I didn’t smell me”, but we all know animals smell hundreds of times better than we do. Thanks to T.V., the Discovery Channel to be exact, they did a segment on a program just like I’m trying to do but they took it a notch higher by also implementing the use of charcoal infused clothing (one popular brand that I know is Scent-lok) along with the soaps and sprays. I could never drop that kind of cash that they charge for the Scent-lok clothing brand. One man used all the products the proper way and wore the special clothes, he then ran into a field with several large boxes, he moved and touched most of them before he settling under one to hide, then a scoundrel sniffing German Sheppard was brought on the scene who almost immediately picked the box this guy was hiding under. This dog accomplished the task with little to no effort at all. I almost believe these products are only made for a ‘self confidence booster’ if you will, or maybe just to help mask a worse funk (ash tray) than the one you spray on(chemical dirt).

What products do you use (if any)?

Have you ever tried natural cover scents (star anise, pine, dirt), if so, what and how?

If you do use some sort of cover scent or gear, are you really confident they work?


In years past I always stored my winter gear in large boxes with some pine boughs and native soils on the bottom, just to keep that dank basement odor off of them.
It seems that many of us are always looking for an advantage to increase our odds of being undetected by mother nature’s creatures, but is it even possible and does it really matter? Over a hundred years ago how many hunters had clean clothes or even took a shower on a weekly basis. And in their photos you’ll see five guys and 20 deer hanging from a rack in the background. Seems to me it really might not be all too important for deer.


I hope my circumstantialities didn’t get in the way of injecting the point of this post…..lol…..

One final thought to ponder.................
If a chemical spray is to be odor absorbing yet is scented like fresh earth, how is this possible? Wouldn't it just absorb the earth scent as well, right inside it's own container? :lol:

Thanks for reading, and responding if you feel so inclined.



Bill… A.K.A. Big Willy



--FIN--
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Postby Fitter » Mon Feb 23, 2009 6:21 pm

I prefer the simple wafer scents that pin right to your hunting outfit or sit on the ground, hang from a branch etc. I'll use the dirt scent for the warmer months of hunting and usually the pine scent for the colder months. Simply because it's fairly unlikely that the dirt scent would be as welcomed during the winter when the ground is frozen.

As for charcoal scent eliminating suits, I ran that course last year when the Scent-Lok deal broke out. A member of another forum we ran wanted to bash the place for not living up to their advertisements but at the same time try and promote another company. Not going to happen. At least not on that forum. Too contradictory to say that one company is under-handed and scum and then say that this other place is very transparent and has the best product. The old switch and bait trick. In reverse.

In my own opinion you can take most scent products that are for hunters and find that in the end you're not going to know if they've worked as advertised or not. If it adds a little more incentive and confidence then maybe that's all the hunter needed to begin with so the product was worth the money. I keep my clothes in a storage container so they don't absorb every other scent in the garage. I won't run out into the woods with clothes that I don't use exclusively for hunting but I'm not a complete fanatic about the entire scent-free scene.

I did an article a couple years back called Commercialization vs Realization that touches on this subject. It ruffled some feathers and downright pissed a few people off. Here's the link for those who are interested http://waterandwoods.net/2008/10/commer ... ion/all/1/
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Postby Big_Willy » Mon Feb 23, 2009 9:38 pm

Fitter wrote:I did an article a couple years back called Commercialization vs Realization that touches on this subject. It ruffled some feathers and downright pissed a few people off. Here's the link for those who are interested http://waterandwoods.net/2008/10/commer ... ion/all/1/




I must say Fitter, you are a very eloquent writer, I’m more of a driveler in comparison with my words slathering together in a somewhat strange fashion at times. That's a great article in the link you attached, very good points I noted for future 4-wheeling arguments.

I did get a chance to read your Bio as well, did you write that in third person or did someone else really write it?
Just curious.

Bill
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Postby Fitter » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:01 pm

I appreciate the comments on the article and writing style. I hear both the good and bad about my material whenever it's published.

The Bio page is a mash-up of different intros and outros from other magazines I have written for as well as a couple live radio interviews which I'd rather forget. And, some is my own input to have an updated bio. I couldn't credit any one source, including myself, for the bio.

I typically don't like to promote our network websites a lot on this forum but, if anyone here enjoys writing, feel free to submit an article for our online magazine at Water and Woods http://waterandwoods.net/magazine-contents/ It get's quite a bit of attention and has helped land some permanent writing careers for several authors.

Shane, [YoungGun] wrote for the magazine for several years. Nearly from the beginning.

Anyway I'm not looking to hijack this thread away from the topic.

What does everyone else think about the use of scents and cover scents? I know you guys must have some opinion.
What you do in the dark will someday come to light.
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Postby Fox_hunter42 » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:15 pm

the best cover up scents I have ever tried came from the farm I was working on. I use to hang my hunting clothes in the barn. After I stopped working on the farm, I would step in and smear the goodies on my clothes.

As far as the diesel and tractor smell, the animals are used to it, they smell it everyday. I started using the Scent away products a couple years ago. I have been busted by more deer and coyotes using it that I ever did when I used nothing.

I used to wear dark green coveralls, and no scents of any kind. Killed alot of critters that way.

On your way to the stand in the morning, step in some poop, or walk in the dirt and wipe your shoes on your clothes. Keep it natural to your area
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Postby Archie » Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:53 pm

I thought for a lot of years that scent spay was a pile of bunk! Then I tried a specific brand, and I have never since been busted by a deer by nose alone (that I was able to verify). However, considering how few coyote I have actually seen while hunting, I have to believe that they can smell me on occasion.

All of that being said, I also agree with Fox_Hunter42 - smelling is not a sin if you smell like your surroundings. I will happily sit in a corner of the field freshly sprinkled with cow essence if I am on a dairy farm. Pine stands are good, and Fox or 'Coon pee are also good - but only if there are Fox or 'Coon around!

You have to be aware of the wind, and use it to your advantage. Coyote do the same, and you have to be smarter than they are. I have shot deer downwind from me with spray on, but I also keep that direction clear for shooting, and don't give them time to linger and smell the roses, so to speak. Take 'em out quick and cleanly! I don't think you have the time to do that with Coyote, so if you see them heading that way, you better be on them with a sight picture and itchy trigger finger, because they will pick you up before you can possibly imagine.

I have shot deer when I was too lazy or rushed to spray up, but as a general rule I do it. Nothing is perfect, but I think it is a legitimate aid if used with prudence. I also am NOT one for running out and buying every scent reduction trick in the book. Don't let the cats sleep on your gear, keep the gas and diesel fuel away (unless you are hunting the back yard of the local service station), and buy the scent spray when it is on sale after the season. A small investment is worth it, but I WON'T pay $120 for a $15 rubbermaid container with a carbon filter in it like the "pros" want you to use.

And I will re-state: A dog is MUUUUUUCH better at picking up scent than the mighty whitetail, and deer ARE as good as they say the are at smelling you...
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